PLANADVISER Weekend Newsdash
Week ending May 5th, 2017
NOTE FROM THE EDITOR
Happy Friday, readers! This week brought the appointment of a new Chair at the Securities and Exchange Commission, Jay Clayton. Under the outgoing chair’s leadership the SEC took a more direct and aggressive role in policing the retirement investment marketplace. It remains to be seen what approach Clayton will take as chair, but it stands to reason that, as a Republican-appointed official, he will be more laissez faire in his approach to government intervention in the client-adviser relationship. Stay with www.planadviser.com for the latest coverage of SEC, DOL, FINRA and more. 
Editor's choice
Jay Clayton Named SEC Chair At Pivotal Time For Industry
President Donald Trump nominated Clayton on January, 20, 2017, and he was confirmed by the Senate on May 2. The nomination by President Trump sends a clear signal to advisers about the likely style and character Clayton will bring to the Commission, especially compared with the ostensibly aggressive approach outgoing Obama-era Chair Mary Jo White brought to the role. Read more >
Mandatory RIA Succession Planning in the Works at SEC
The Securities and Exchange Commission is proposing a new rule and rule amendments under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 aimed at bolstering advisory industry succession planning.  Read more >
Broad SEC Initiative Targets RIAs and Brokers
SEC staff intends to revamp focus on registered investment advisers and broker/dealers selling investment products to retail investors and retirement savers. Read more >
Inside Look At SEC Deficiency Letter Trends
A new publication from the SEC outlines the five most frequent compliance topics identified in deficiency letters sent to SEC-registered investment advisers. Read more >
Rumbles of SEC Uniform Broker Standard Growing Louder
The Securities and Exchange Commission has given several signs that it could soon introduce a uniform standard of client care for registered brokers and advisers.  Read more >
MOST POPULAR STORIES
Many Retirees Wish They Had Delayed Taking Social Security Benefits

MassMutual says a married couple that lives into their 90s but decides to begin their Social Security benefits at age 62 as opposed to age 70 could be leaving as much as half a million dollars on the table, or forfeiting $2,000 to $4,000 a month for life.

SECURE Act's House Passage Brings Test of Congressional Mediators

With the passage of the SECURE Act by the House of Representatives, experts tell PLANADVISER they are optimistic that agreement will be reached with the Senate during this Congress, but the many supporters of retirement reform will have to wait and see how compromise might be reached.

Some Expect Senate Action Sooner Than Later on SECURE Act

One retirement industry executive says she believes the Senate could act quite quickly in taking up the SECURE Act, which just passed the House of Representatives with a practically unanimous yea vote.

Another Bill Proposed as Senate Committee Hearing Brings Calls for Retirement Action

Besides a lengthy Finance Committee hearing discussing the popular RESA legislation, the day on Capitol Hill also brought news of the introduction of the new Retirement Security and Savings Act.

J.P. Morgan Agrees to Pay $75 Million to Settle ERISA Lawsuit
The consolidated litigation alleges the firm invested its stable value funds in risky assets, causing losses to retirement plan participants.

Editorial: Alison Cooke Mintzer alison.mintzer@strategic-i.com

Advertising: Paul Zampitella paul.zampitella@strategic-i.com

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